Ceph7
Ceph10
Ceph9
Cephalotussidecolouredcopy

This method of increasing stock works with both the flat leaves and less successfully with the pitchers. Although slower at producing mature plants than root cuttings, it has the advantage of not requiring the disturbance of the parent plant and, as I said before, Cephalotus can on occasions resent root disturbance.

Choose a reasonably sized mature pitcher or flat leaf and, tugging it gently with the fingers of one hand, use a small cocktail stick sized implement in the other hand to prise the end of the stalk away from where it meets the crown. Try to get as much of this area where it meets the main plant as possible. Soak the cuttings for an hour in a solution of 10 drops of Superthrive per gallon of distilled water, then soak for a further 10 minutes in a fungicide solution or a Trichoderma solution.

Insert the end of the stalk to a depth of a few millimetres into ideally live spagnum moss or your usual compost mix, also, keep it the right way up (see picture). Place the pot in a shaded, warm - around 68F, humid - around 70% position. New growth appears usually within 4-6 weeks but can take longer. As long as the cutting remains green it will root, should it start to yellow - it's had it - remove and discard the leaf. Success rate is in my experience around 90%.

Takingleafcutting
Leafcuttingplanted
cephrooting
Picture credit link
Picture credit link
item4
Picture credit link
Picture credit link
item4a
Picture credit link
Picture credit link
item4a1